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July 30, 2014, 3:05 am

Two fugitives captured by law enforcement

Law enforcement agencies put the cuffs on two fugitives this week, one man who was wanted for murder, and the other for hindering the investigation into his own almost deadly shooting.

On Tuesday, 22-year old Steven Miller was apprehended in Texas by the U.S. Marshals without incident. Miller was wanted for the murder of 24-year old Maurice Kimble, who was gunned down outside the trendy PYT Bar and Restaurant on June 11. Steven Miller will be extradited back to Philadelphia to face first degree murder charges.

Also on Tuesday, 22-year-old James Ellis was arrested and charged with perjury, false report to the police, and hindering apprehension or prosecution. The defendant allegedly lied to police about a shooting in 2011 in the Fairhill section of the city where he was the victim.

On June 27, 2011, just before 7:30 p.m., Ellis was shot multiple times by a still unknown individual. Ellis was driving a 2000 Buick LeSabre at the time, and crashed into several parked cars. Police found Ellis outside the car in a pool of blood, with drugs and a 9mm handgun on the seat. After being treated for his nearly fatal injuries, Ellis continued to tell police that he did not know who shot him, even though investigators were able to find information in Facebook postings by Ellis that clearly indicated otherwise.

In an unrelated criminal investigation, an unlicensed chiropractor pleaded guilty in federal court to 50 counts of health care fraud.

On Tuesday, Tahib Smith Ali, 35, of Philadelphia, pleaded guilty to 50 counts of health care fraud, 50 counts of false statements in health care matters, and one count of aggravated identity theft. According to United States Attorney Zane David Memeger, Ali allegedly posed as a chiropractor and physical therapist while operating a Philadelphia clinic known as Oasis Holistic Healing Village, located on South 17th Street.  Ali, who holds no medical licenses, saw patients, represented to them that he was a chiropractor, and submitted more than $1.5 million in fraudulent claims for chiropractic services to Independence Blue Cross. The claims were allegedly submitted under the name and medical provider number of the licensed chiropractor who no longer worked at the clinic.

He faces a mandatory two-year prison term for aggravated identity theft in addition to a possible sentence of more than 30 months, under advisory sentencing guidelines, for the health care fraud and false statements counts.